Synchronous belt and V belt: How to pick between them?

Power transmission in linear motion designs is often through rotary-to-linear devices, chain, or belt drives. The earliest belt iteration — and one that’s still economical today — is the friction-based V-belt design. These pair a belt with a pulley (often on an electric motor’s geared output shaft) to provide reliable operation in myriad end-user and industrial designs.

Modern V belts are rubber, urethane synthetic, and neoprene designs with either a V or trapezoidal profile. The latter increases the amount of contact between V belts and pulleys to minimize tension needed to transmit torque. Even so, polyurethane outperforms rubber thanks to its higher resistance to chemicals and adaptability to specialized profiles. (Polyurethane also boosts the shear strength of the teeth on synchronous belts covered in this article’s next section).

A V belt’s most important element — its tension-bearing top — includes fiber cords for strength to bear the actual traction load. Modern tension-member cords are often aramide, polyester, fiberglass, or even steel. Pre-stretched variations help minimize stretch. The cords embed into the main belt material that serves to hold the belt body together and shed heat. The part of most modern friction belts that engages the pulley is a compression section designed to actually wedge into pulley grooves as a way to boost engagement. In many instances, a rubberized fabric cover helps protect the belt and prevent slipping and overheating cords.

Though they’re versatile and forgiving, improperly sized friction-based belt drives can slip (tangentially on the pulley — a form of lost motion) and creep axially. That can make for unreliable speed output. Here are some things to remember if a V-belt drive makes the most sense for a motion axis: Output torque depends on belt resistance to tension and belt-pulley adherence. The latter is why oils and greases must be kept away from belt drives — or threaten drive failure due to slipping.

Be prepared to specify V belts by cross section (including the belt’s top width, V angle, and depth) and overall pitch length (defined as a circumferential length along a belt’s pitch line). Then suitable V belts are narrowed further by which have sufficient power ratings (determined by rpm and sheave speed) to satisfy design demand of nominal horsepower (to be transmitted or output at the motor) with application of a service factor.

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What is V Belt Drive?

This v belt drive uses only v belts and is passed over the driver and driven pulleys. The open and cross belt drives are only possible with v belts.

The motion or power is transmitted from one shaft to another shaft by means of belts, i.e., these belts are used when the two shafts are apart at some distance.

Belt drives produce the least amount of noise and vibration.

When the belt is rotating in a clockwise direction or the belt motion is from driver to driven pulley or the belt is in forwarding motion, then the upper part of the belt is under sag, called as the slack side of the belt.

This portion is always under compression

The lower portion of the belt under tension is called as the tight side of the belt. There is a friction between the belt and pulley which provides the grip and enables the power to transmit between two pulleys.

In a belt-drive, the power transmission depends on the amount of friction between pulley and belt. The slip can be eliminated by running the v belt with a slower speed.

The pulley used for v belt drive is slightly crowned to avoid the belt from running out of it. Then the v belt can be run with higher speed.

The crowning of the pulley holds the v belt centrally. The effective pulling power of the belt causes the rotation of the driven pulley, and it is the difference between the tensions on tight and slack sides.

The materials used for the pulley are cast iron, steel, and steel alloys. For low speeds and light work applications, usually, wood is recommended.

The drive is obtained by using either v belts

V belt drives are suitable to transmit power from one place to another place when the distance between the two places or pulleys or shafts is larger, and v belts are for short distance.

The ends of the v belts are joined by using rivets, nuts, and bolts or joined by lacing or cementing methods. Wires are also used to join the v belt ends since this method is easier and joined quickly.

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Advantages of Rubber Conveyor Belt

Rubber conveyor could transmit shock and vibration. Therefore, rubber conveyor belt has the characteristics of a lower transmission noise.

And rubber conveyor belt does not require lubrication which could meet the needs of high-speed engine’s transmission.

Moreover, the rubber conveyor belts required little installation space, has good ability to adapt to environment.

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Timing Belt Identification & Replacement Guide

The first step in identifying which timing belt that you have is to look for identifying numbers and/or letters marked on the timing belt. These numbers indicate a standard trade size and will help in identifying the specifics of the cog belt. Also, by being able to identify the manufacturer and/or trade name on the timing belt will assist in the identification process.

Secondly, if there is no trade size indicated on the timing belt do the following:

Measure the width of the timing belt.

Note the construction of the timing belt. Rubber construction is extremely flexible while a polyurethane construction is plastic like and has little flexibility.

Measure the pitch. This is the distance in millimeters (mm) and/or inches between the center of the crown of one tooth and the center of the crown of the tooth adjacent to it.

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The Common Types of V Belts & Their Standard Sizes

When we want to transfer power from one shaft to another, we use power transmission devices, such as belts, chains and gears. In today’s article we will discuss a highly flexible and efficient power transmission device known as V belt. V belts get their name from their trapezoidal shape, which helps them wedge into the sheaves.

Twisted synthetic fibrous tensile chords, compressed by synthetic rubber, form a typical V belt, rendering it strength and flexibility. To break the bending resistance even further, to keep the operation temperature lower, and to give higher capacity, V belts come in cogged construction as well. As opposed to chains, V belts do not require lubrication or maintenance. They also solve the slippage and alignment problems.

The types of V belts and their standard sizes:

There are three common V belt types: Classical V belt (classified by their dimensions from A to E), Narrow V series (classified by their dimensions 3V, 5V, and 8V), and light duty Fractional Horsepower belt (classified by their dimensions 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L). Their counterpart cogged belt is classified by the letter X. For example, Classical V cog belt will be 3VX, 5VX, etc.

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What are the advantages of using V belt drive?

V Belt drives are surely beneficial to use in the B2B industrial sector. These drive systems are also known by the name of Friction Drives since power is conducted as an outcome of the belt’s obedience to the pulley.

These v belt systems are a great economical option for commercial, industrial, agricultural, home appliance and even automotive applications.

One should also realize that v belt drives are even very easy to install, dampen any shock load and don’t need any lubrication.

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Industrial of poly v belts

Poly v belts are produced in a monobloc design and made up of multiple v shaped ribs. These ribs run along the inside length of the belt, as appose to across the belt like the teeth on a timing belt. The v shaped ribs are designed to run on a pulley with corresponding grooves, which the ribs fit neatly into. The belt transmits torque by contact of the belt rib flanks and the pulley grooves. The belts one piece structure guarantees an even distribution of tension across the width of the pulley where the belt is in contact.

The poly v belt comprises of a number of ribs made from a compound of high abrasion resistance elastomer, geometrically optimised for maximum contact with the pulley. A polyester or aramid cord runs through the belt for strength whilst the reinforced rubber backing protects the cord and the radial stability of the belt. The rubber backing can also be used to transfer power onto a smooth pulley. This combination of design features and materials allows the poly v belt to counter-bend, enabling a single belt to drive several accessories from both sides of the belt.

A significant benefit of the poly v belt is its compactness. Designed to have a larger contact surface area than that of the traditional V-belt or Flat Belt, the poly v belt can operate at a minimum pulley diameter of just 9mm, compared to a minimum pulley diameter of 50mm with a traditional V-belt. Improved transmission ratio is also possible (Poly V 1:60 vs V-belt 1:20) removing the need for stepped pulleys. In addition to these space saving features, reduced belt width is also possible for a given geometry and the same power transfer. The poly v belt also offers reduced noise and vibration levels. Thanks to the monobloc design, there is no need to match belts like with v-belts, reducing maintenance and eliminating belt differential ‘flapping’. Add to the above the increased lifespan on a poly v belt – which can last up to four times longer than a V-belt – and it is no surprise that the poly v belt is fast becoming the chosen belt for designers, manufacturers and industrial applications.

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Heavy Black Rubber Conveyor Belt

Rubber conveyor belt is designed for use as an abrasion resistant and impact resistant rubber sheet and is ideal for mounting pads, mechanical sealing strips and industrial flapping. In general construction and industrial use where durability is imperative and ordinary rubber is not up to the task, this rubber product is used to maximize the life of the project.

Rubber conveyor belt is available in a 2ply and 3ply fabric insertions in the rubber sheet. The 2ply is 7.5 millimeters thick, and the 3ply is 10.5 millimeters thick. This is the most abrasion and tear resistant rubber product ideal for industrial bumpers and skirting.

This rubber conveyor belt is made from a blend of Neoprene, SBR, and Nitrile Rubbers with a smooth, finished surface. It is used to maximize the life of a project where durability is imperative and ordinary rubber is not sufficient.

This article comes from mag-gage edit released

The Common Types of V Belts

When we want to transfer power from one shaft to another, we use power transmission devices, such as belts, chains and gears. In today’s article we will discuss a highly flexible and efficient power transmission device known as V belt. V belts get their name from their trapezoidal shape, which helps them wedge into the sheaves.Twisted synthetic fibrous tensile chords, compressed by synthetic rubber, form a typical V belt, rendering it strength and flexibility. To break the bending resistance even further, to keep the operation temperature lower, and to give higher capacity, V belts come in cogged construction as well. As opposed to chains, V belts do not require lubrication or maintenance. They also solve the slippage and alignment problems.

The types of V belts and their standard sizes:

There are three common V belt types: Classical V belt (classified by their dimensions from A to E), Narrow V series (classified by their dimensions 3V, 5V, and 8V), and light duty Fractional Horsepower belt (classified by their dimensions 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L). Their counterpart cogged belt is classified by the letter X. For example, Classical V cog belt will be 3VX, 5VX, etc.

Classical V belt:

Conventional V belt is the most common V belt type and has been around the longest. The Initial classical V design replaced leather belts by taking over their applications in a wide range of industries, such as agriculture, ventilation, and industrial machinery. Classical V belts are capable of covering a load range from fractional(less than 1 HP) to 500 horsepower. They are less efficient than narrow V belt and generally contribute to higher bearing loads. However, classical V belts have high tolerance for poor operating conditions.

Narrow V series:

Narrow belts are optimum for load transfer and force distribution because of their greater depth to width ratio. That’s their advantage over classical V belts. Narrow belts are also suitable for drives with high belt speeds, again, for their powerfully compact size. Narrow belts have the ability to transmit up to three times the horsepower of classical V belt in the same drive space. They can handle drives from 1 to 1000 horsepower.

Fractional Horsepower Belt:

FHP light duty V belts are used most often as single belt on drives of 1 horsepower or less. Its design is for relatively light loads. The common applications for this V belt type are domestic washing machines, small fans, refrigerators, and garage equipment. Light V belts should never be used on any heavy-duty industrial applications, even if they seem to fit the classical or narrow V belt pulley grooves.

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Fan Belt Design Engineering

General

Fan belts are the workhorse within industry, available from virtually every distributor and adaptable to practically any drive. They are presently available in a wide variety of standard sizes and types, for transmitting almost any amount of load power.

Operation

Typically, fan belts drives operate best at speeds between 1500 to 6000 ft/min ( 8 and 30 m/s). For standard fan belts, ideal peak capacity speed is approximately 4500 ft/min (23 m/s). Narrow fan belts, however, will operate up to 10,000 ft/min (50 m/s).

Advantages

  • Fan belt drives permit large speed ratios and provide long life. They are easily installed and removed, quiet, and low maintenance.
  • Initial selection and design consideration fan belt application
  • How much power do you need to transmit and at what speed?
  • Service factor fan belts your particular application.
  • Determine the fan belt design horsepower.
  • Based on your results, determine which belt section would be appropriate for your drive – See fan belt supplier. Narrow belt sheaves are more compact than Classical belt sheaves. Some fan belts are more appropriate for specific applications.
  • Determine the ratio of your drive application based on the Ratio formula – center distance has been pre-selected based on the drive size.
  • Find the number of fan belts required by dividing the design horsepower by the belt/HP.
  • Verify the validity of this drive by consulting the number of grooves available in these sheave sizes.
  • Verify if dynamic balancing is needed for each sheave based on the Dynamic or Two-Plane Balancing formula .